Author: Sabrina

The Healing Totem

The Healing Totem

“Every time, there’s not enough chips,” said Wayne Price, master carver of the Healing Totem Project at the opening ceremonies of Whitehorse’s first National Indigenous Day as a statutory holiday.

The crowd gathered around the totem pole that Price and a group of about 20 carvers created in 2013. Price said each chip represents one person. The chips were ceremonially burned and a portion of the ashes is inside the totem pole.

Community members carried the pole seven blocks through Whitehorse to of Main Street. It serves as a reminder of hope for the future.

The Quebecois

The Quebecois

I’m working on a photo series about Quebecois identity. What does it mean for each of my subjects to be Quebecois in their everyday lives?

For the purposes of the project, I’m using the definition of “Quebecois” identity loosely and letting my subjects define it for themselves: Must they be Francophone? (No.) Born in Quebec? (Not necessarily).  But some are Francophone, born in Quebec or both.

More photos to be added as the project continues. If you are interesed in being photographed for this project, send me a message.

The promise of a teaching career

For more than a decade, job market predictors have said there is about to be a mass retirement in Ontario with a teacher shortage and a dire need for new, young teachers.

As they wait for this to materialize, passionate, qualified teachers fight to get the few available full-time positions. Some make it and some don’t.

Here’s what it’s like to fight for the job you want in an incredibly tight market:

The man behind Ottawa’s Vietnamese community

A lab accident in the late 1960s changed a young man’s career plans, his life and eventually the city of Ottawa.

Can Le has a quick smile and exudes energy as he shows a visitor around. The retired economist and president of the board of directors of the Vietnamese Canadian Centre on Somerset Street has spent the past 40 years growing and nurturing the Vietnamese community in Ottawa.

“He’s a determined one,” says Ha Quyen Nguyen, volunteer coordinator for the centre. “For everything he plans to do, he will go until the end.”

When Le arrived in Ottawa, there were few people here of Southeast Asian descent. Today, about 9,000 people of Vietnamese origin live in the city. Most have him to thank for the support systems that have allowed their community to thrive. And Ottawa, which continues its tradition of taking in refugees right up to the present day, owes some of its welcoming mindset to Can Le’s work.

Liem Duong, a software engineer for the Department of National Defence who has known Le since 1983, says he is known across Canada “from Vancouver to Halifax.” But “if you ask him, he won’t say much about himself.”

So we’ll tell you about him…

Read the whole story at the Ottawa Citizen:

The Capital Builders: How Can Le shaped Ottawa’s Vietnamese Community

Heavy construction frustrates Ottawa commuters

Heavy construction frustrates Ottawa commuters

Late for work? You’re not alone. Canada 150 and Confederation Line construction projects have led to lane closures, long delays and frustration for commuters going through the downtown area.

Some of the most heavily travelled Centretown roads are under construction, or slated to be soon. Lyon Street, McLeod Street, Queen Street, Rideau Street, and Kent Street are just some of the main thoroughfares affected by the upheaval, clogging city streets during rush hour.

“Since I’m on the 95, I’m passing right through the #OnTrack2018 mess,” said Evan Przesiecki, an Ottawa resident and Carleton journalism student.

commuting_through_construction_in_downtown_ottawa

Please head over to Capital News Online to see the rest of the story I worked on as part of the multimedia team. Find out the Ottawa neighbourhoods with the most construction and why things may only be getting worse when winter starts.